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Harlem/Washington Heights/Inwood

North of Central Park lies the vibrant neighborhood of Harlem. Harlem is not just a destination; it is the cultural capital of Black America. 125th Street continues to be the lifeline of this area and is ever-expanding with new shops and boutiques. Harlem’s historic district contains charming brownstones and

Harlem/Washington Heights/Inwood
125th Street
New York, NY 10031
North of Central Park lies the vibrant neighborhood of Harlem. Harlem is not just a destination; it is the cultural capital of Black America. 125th Street continues to be the lifeline of this area and is ever-expanding with new shops and boutiques. Harlem’s historic district contains charming brownstones and a collection of religious buildings in a variety of architectural styles. Back in the day, Harlem was famed for its Jazz legends: this was the place to hear America’s indigenous music performed by entertainers like Dizzy Gillespie and Duke Ellington in legendary clubs such as the Sugar Cane and the Cotton Club. The neighborhood still honors its musical roots with many fine clubs.

North of Harlem, lying in the shadow of the majestic George Washington Bridge, Washington Heights is a bustling ethnic neighborhood that’s becoming a popular destination with New Yorkers and tourists alike. The area’s biggest highlight is the Morris-Jumel Mansion, a stunning Palladian-style mansion that served as headquarters for George Washington during the autumn of 1776. Another place that makes its mark in the neighborhood is the Hispanic Society of America Library & Museum, located in a building once owned by John James Audubon. Since 1908, the Hispanic Society of America, The American Academy of Arts & Letters and Boricua College have inhabited this landmark. A growing number of artists and families are relocating to this neighborhood due to the attraction of art deco buildings, big parks, hilly streets and low rents.

Above Washington Heights is Manhattan’s northernmost neighborhood, Inwood, stretching up from Dyckman Street to 218th Street (the last residential street in Manhattan). One of the main attractions in the Inwood neighborhood is The Cloisters, a part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Set in Fort Tryon Park overlooking the Hudson River, this museum features Medieval Art and Architecture within a replica of a medieval cloister. As the island of Manhattan narrows north of Dyckman Street, the shoreline turns into the wilderness of Inwood Hill Park. Near 214th Street, in the area of the ball fields in Inwood Hill Park, is said to be the legendary spot of where Peter Minuit bought the strip of land called ‘Manhatta’ from the Native Americans in 1626. Inwood Hill Park also has biking and hiking paths throughout the 196-acre that contains the last original forest and marshes that used to cover the island of Manhattan. It is also a haven for the new breed of bald eagles nesting within these parks. Hiking along the paths of Inwood Hill Park you can imagine what Manhattan was like those hundreds of years ago.

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